Stan Amster Photography – Scenic and Commercial Photography in Northern New England.

Covered Bridge

Middle Covered Bridge in Woodstock Vermont.

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The Middle Covered Bridge in Woodstock was built in 1969 replacing an iron bridge that had been in use since 1877. The Middle Covered Bridge was constructed following traditional methods. Wooden pegs were used instead of nails, and the bridge was built on dry land and then pulled across the river on scaffolding drawn by oxen walking a capstan. With every turn of the capstan the bridge was pulled 3 1/3 inches closer to its final destination

On May 11, 1974, the bridge was set afire by arsonists. It took three years, and almost $55,000 to complete the required repairs.

In addition to the Middle Covered Bridge in the village, Woodstock has two other covered bridges, which are located in the hamlets of Taftsville and West Woodstock. The Taftsville Covered Bridge was severely damaged in 2011 by Tropical Storm Irene. After extensive renovations it reopened in 2013.

Honeymoon Covered Bridge in Jackson New Hampshire.

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In 1873, town residents debated whether to build and/or repair at least two bridges that crossed the Wildcat River.[1] Honeymoon Bridge was built in 1876, just south of the confluence of the Wildcat with the Ellis River, by Charles Austin Broughton and his son Frank. The Broughton family owned a dairy farm on the east side of the Saco River. Serving in the Civil War, Charles had carpentry skills needed to do the work. In 1899, the town of Jackson paid the Goodrich Falls Electric Company to illuminate the bridge. The sidewalk on the side of the bridge was added in 1930 according to town records, and improvements were done in 1965 to improve visibility and provide parking. In 2001 the bridge received a US$64,000 grant that provided for the installation of a fire protection system that included sprinklers, among other things. Further rehabilitation of the bridge was completed three years later. Today, Honeymoon Bridge is an often-photographed tourist attraction.

 

Honeymoon Bridge is one of 20 examples of the Paddleford truss design. The bridge was nicknamed “Honeymoon” bridge from the tradition of lovers kissing under it for good luck. The name dates to at least 1936, with bridge historian Adelbert M. Jakeman possibly giving the bridge its nickname. Honeymoon Bridge is designated as Covered Bridge 51 by the state.

Some early fall foliage in Waitsfield Vermont

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I took a quick trip to Waitsfield Vermont yesterday to checkout the early fall colors. The mad River Valley is one of my favorite places to find fall foliage

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