Stan Amster Photography – Scenic and Commercial Photography in Northern New England.

Covered Bridge

Honeymoon Covered Bridge in Jackson New Hampshire.

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In 1873, town residents debated whether to build and/or repair at least two bridges that crossed the Wildcat River.[1] Honeymoon Bridge was built in 1876, just south of the confluence of the Wildcat with the Ellis River, by Charles Austin Broughton and his son Frank. The Broughton family owned a dairy farm on the east side of the Saco River. Serving in the Civil War, Charles had carpentry skills needed to do the work. In 1899, the town of Jackson paid the Goodrich Falls Electric Company to illuminate the bridge. The sidewalk on the side of the bridge was added in 1930 according to town records, and improvements were done in 1965 to improve visibility and provide parking. In 2001 the bridge received a US$64,000 grant that provided for the installation of a fire protection system that included sprinklers, among other things. Further rehabilitation of the bridge was completed three years later. Today, Honeymoon Bridge is an often-photographed tourist attraction.

 

Honeymoon Bridge is one of 20 examples of the Paddleford truss design. The bridge was nicknamed “Honeymoon” bridge from the tradition of lovers kissing under it for good luck. The name dates to at least 1936, with bridge historian Adelbert M. Jakeman possibly giving the bridge its nickname. Honeymoon Bridge is designated as Covered Bridge 51 by the state.

Christmas time in Stark New Hampshire.

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I thought I would go up to Stark New Hampshire last night because I thought it would be fun. Well, an hour later and cold fingers and toes produced a few nice pictures.

Willard Twin Covered Bridges in Hartland Vermont

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I will NEVER attempt to take this picture again. Scared was an understatement.

Willard “Old Bridge”
Originally built in 1870, the “Old Bridge” in the background was later renovated in 1953 and repaired in 1979. The bridge spans 128 feet and is sometimes referred to as the North Hartland East Covered Bridge. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in August, 1973.

Willard “New Bridge”
There were always two covered bridges at this location. The original second bridge (in the foreground) was built circa 1872, but was replaced in 1938 when the original was lost in the September hurricane of that same year. Many years later in 2001, when it began to deteriorate, the “New Bridge” was constructed and stands there still today. This bridge is also known as the North Hartland West Twin Covered Bridge.

Sawyers Crossing Covered Bridge in Swanzey New Hampshire

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The Sawyers Crossing Covered Bridge, also known as the Cresson Bridge, is a wooden covered bridge carrying Sawyers Crossing Road over the Ashuelot River in northern Swanzey, New Hampshire. Built in 1859 to replace an older bridge, it continues to serve as a part of Swanzey’s transportation network, and is one of the state’s few surviving 19th-century covered bridges. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

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